Markdown

Notes courtesy MacDown.

The Basics

Before I tell you about all the extra syntaxes and capabilities I have, I’ll introduce you to the basics of standard markdown. If you already know markdown, and want to jump straight to learning about the fancier things I can do, I suggest you skip to the Markdown preference pane. Lets jump right in.

Line Breaks

To force a line break, put two spaces and a newline (return) at the end of the line.

  • This two-line bullet won’t break

  • This two-line bullet
    will break

Here is the code:

* This two-line bullet 
won't break

* This two-line bullet  
will break

Strong and Emphasize

Strong: **Strong** or __Strong__ (Command-B)
Emphasize: *Emphasize* or _Emphasize_0

Headers (like this one!)

Header 1
========

Header 2
--------

or

# Header 1
## Header 2
### Header 3
#### Header 4
##### Header 5
###### Header 6

Inline

Just put angle brackets around an email and it becomes clickable: uranusjr@gmail.com
<uranusjr@gmail.com>

Same thing with urls: http://macdown.uranusjr.com
<http://macdown.uranusjr.com>

Perhaps you want to some link text like this: Macdown Website
[Macdown Website](http://macdown.uranusjr.com "Title") (The title is optional)

Reference style

Sometimes it looks too messy to include big long urls inline, or you want to keep all your urls together.

Make a link [a link][arbitrary_id] then on it’s own line anywhere else in the file:
[arbitrary_id]: http://macdown.uranusjr.com "Title"

If the link text itself would make a good id, you can link like this [like this][], then on it’s own line anywhere else in the file:
[like this]: http://macdown.uranusjr.com

Images

Inline

![Alt Image Text](path/or/url/to.jpg "Optional Title")

Reference style

![Alt Image Text][image-id]
on it’s own line elsewhere:
[image-id]: path/or/url/to.jpg "Optional Title"

Lists

  • Lists must be preceded by a blank line (or block element)
  • Unordered lists start each item with a *
  • - works too
    • Indent a level to make a nested list
      1. Ordered lists are supported.
      2. Start each item (number-period-space) like 1.
      3. It doesn’t matter what number you use, I will render them sequentially
      4. So you might want to start each line with 1. and let me sort it out

Here is the code:

* Lists must be preceded by a blank line (or block element)
* Unordered lists start each item with a `*`
- `-` works too
	* Indent a level to make a nested list
		1. Ordered lists are supported.
		2. Start each item (number-period-space) like `1. `
		42. It doesn't matter what number you use, I will render them sequentially
		1. So you might want to start each line with `1.` and let me sort it out

Block Quote

Angle brackets > are used for block quotes.
Technically not every line needs to start with a > as long as there are no empty lines between paragraphs.
Looks kinda ugly though. > Block quotes can be nested.
> > Multiple Levels

Most markdown syntaxes work inside block quotes.

Here is the code:

> Angle brackets `>` are used for block quotes.  
Technically not every line needs to start with a `>` as long as
there are no empty lines between paragraphs.  
> Looks kinda ugly though.
> > Block quotes can be nested.  
> > > Multiple Levels
>
> Most markdown syntaxes work inside block quotes.
>
> * Lists
> * [Links][arbitrary_id]
> * Etc.

Inline Code

Inline code is indicated by surrounding it with backticks:
`Inline code`

If your code has `backticks` that need to be displayed, you can use double backticks:
``Code with `backticks` `` (mind the spaces preceding the final set of backticks)

Block Code

If you indent at least four spaces or one tab, I’ll display a code block.

print('This is a code block')
print('The block must be preceded by a blank line')
print('Then indent at least 4 spaces or 1 tab')
    print('Nesting does nothing. Your code is displayed Literally')

I also know how to do something called Fenced Code Blocks which I will tell you about later.

Horizontal Rules

If you type three asterisks *** or three dashes --- on a line, I’ll display a horizontal rule: